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RinQuinQuin

L'APÉRITIF À LA PÊCHE

RinQuinQuin (pronounced “ran-can-can”) is born by gently infusing regional sweet peaches and their leaves to a neutral spirit. RinQuinQuin (15% abv and 30 proof) can be served chilled or over ice; and with the addition of club soda, it can also turn into a refreshing, mouth watering spritzer. Lastly, RinQuinQuin can also be poured over fruits or ice cream.

After assembly of the various components, RinQuinQuin is "aged" in barrels for 6 months to give it time to round off and to be harmonized. Then, it is filtered, inspected, tasted and bottled. The result is a smooth and mellow apéritif wine, bursting with fruity and peach flavor. It is also possible to detect subtle hints of apricot and vanilla.

SALES TOOL COCKTAILS

After assembly of the various components, RinQuinQuin is "aged" in barrels for 6 months to give it time to round off and to be harmonized. Then, it is filtered, inspected, tasted and bottled. The result is a smooth and mellow apéritif wine, bursting with fruity and peach flavor. It is also possible to detect subtle hints of apricot and vanilla.

SALES TOOL COCKTAILS

Peach tree leaves are picked at the end of October

Right at the time when they take on their golden color, but before being carried away by the Mistral wind. The fruit and leaves are placed to macerate separately in mixtures of alcohol, white wine, essential oil of citrus and sugar in order to extract all of the aromatic strength. It takes between 6 and 12 months of "close" contact to obtain all of the aromatic subtlety of the fruit and leaves in resulting infusions.

Botanical

The fruits are picked when ripe, by selecting several varieties of peaches including:


- The Cardinale peach with orange red skin and pale-yellow juicy flesh;
- The Coronet peach, white, sweet, juicy and aromatic;
- The Junegold peach, with orange yellow skin and light-yellow aromatic flesh.

Cardinale Peach

Cardinale Peach

Coronet Peach

Coronet Peach

June Gold Peach

June Gold Peach

Territories & Album

The People

Yves Rafattelli

Master Distiller

Yves grew up on the hills of Upper-Provence, where his father used to take him hunting and fishing, as well as picking mushrooms and harvesting herbs used in traditional Provence meals. Yves joined the Distillery in 1981, and he acquired his know how in distilling herbs from Jean Augier, a 3rd generation distiller, who started distilling in the late 1940s with his father. “Each still has its own personality” says Yves “Jean knew ours perfectly and taught me all that was there to know. Mastering the old still helped me tremendously in choosing a new one, when we had to change machinery in 2017. It is not only about the quality of the raw materials, the way you operate your still has to match the quality of what you are distilling as well.” Yves now has perfect control of the distillation process, and yet he learns something new every day which is what he loves the most about his job. “It is the "charm of the still” Yves likes to say “There's always the expectation of what's going to come out. Every shift turns into a challenge on how to extract the most subtle scented spirits.”

The People

Helene Rogeon

Master Blender

Helene Rogeon, born in the region of Cognac in 1962, joined the distillery as an oenologist in 1986, right after graduating from Bordeaux Wine University. Helene loves assembling botanicals and wines to create great flavors, and she turned her passion into her profession. As a master blender, Helene checks that the right amount of each ingredient is used correctly. She is responsible for the final flavor, making sure it doesn’t change. Helene is the one keeping the recipe, and keeping it secret, since the proportion of each ingredient in the blend is part of the Distillerie’s core know-how. For RinQuinQuin, Helene also needs to adjust the quantities from time to time to make sure it always tastes the same. That is because, even if picked up from the same fields every year, peaches may have a different flavors from one harvest to another, depending on how rainy, sunny, windy the year was.

The History

13th Century to 18th Century

Each period has its forbidden fruit, after the apple came the pear. From Arnaud de Villeneuve (13th century) to Gabriel (18th century), the peach has engendered some distrust. Since that time, and for the greatest pleasure of our taste, we can eat the soft skin of this fruit with multiple benefits.

The peach comes to us from distant lands: traces of its presence in China are found approximately 500 years before the common era. And from Persia (the origin of its name "Prunus Persica"), it reached the West, over the course of centuries. In Provence in the past, the peach tree often was seen as therapeutic, an aspect that has now been completely forgotten. In medicine, its leaves, flower and seeds, as well as the sap of the peach tree were used. The leaves and flowers were used for their laxative, diuretic, calming and deworming properties. The peach itself was soaked in wine and used for its aperitif properties... the aperitif as a potion became the aperitif for pleasure.

The name RinQuinQuin in Provençal means an invigorating drink (from the verb requincilhar: strengthening). This was frequently the way that one's aperitif or digestive were named. This aperitif, as surprising as it is delicate, comes from a family recipe refined by Distilleries et Domaines de Provence to give it the colors and flavors of Provence.