ARE YOU OF LEGAL DRINKING AGE?

You must be of legal drinking age in your region to enter.

Yes No

Absentroux

Vermouth a l'Absinthe

Absentroux is a classic vermouth, blending Wormwood, Cinnamon, lemon balm, mint, mugwort, green aniseed, cinnamon, coriander and pink peppercorns on a white wine background (dried plants and spices are macerated in alcohol, then assembled to the wine).

Absentroux carries the guenuine Bitterness of traditional vermouth but with greater richness and persistence.

SALES TOOL COCKTAILS

Absentroux carries the guenuine Bitterness of traditional vermouth but with greater richness and persistence.

SALES TOOL COCKTAILS

Absentroux can be served chilled, on the rocks, or in a cocktail. (18% abv and 36 proof).

The final taste is determined by the temperature, the length of maceration and the degree of alcohol. After the required duration of maceration, the infusion (the liquid) is separated from the vegetable matter (plants and spices). The final blending is a very delicate operation that mixes white wine, infusions, plant and spice distillates and essences in a fine balance to obtain the finished product.

Botanical

Absentroux contains no less than 15 different botanicals

Absentroux is a Vermouth aromatized wine made with absinthe (wormwood), bitter plants and spices, macerated into white wine for about 6 months.

Lemon Balm

Lemon Balm

Lemon Balm is a perennial herbaceous plant in the mint family, with leaves smelling and tasting of lemon and native to south-central Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, Iran.

Mint

Mint

Mint are aromatic, almost exclusively perennial herbs. The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs, often downy, and with a serrated margin. Leaf colors range from dark green and gray green to purple, blue, and sometimes pale yellow.

Mugwort

Mugwort

Mugwort is a perennial plant native to Northern Europe, and Asia; but it can also be found in many parts of North America. The mugwort plant has angular reddish-brown stems that have bitter-tasting leaves with a sage-like aroma. The mugwort plant has been traditionally used for everything from digestive disorders to beer-making, insect repellent, and more.

Green Aniseed

Green Aniseed

Anise, also called aniseed, is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae native to the eastern Mediterranean region and Southwest Asia. Its flavor has similarities with some other spices, such as star anise, fennel, and licorice.

Cinnamon

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used mainly as an aromatic condiment and flavoring additive in a wide variety of cuisines, sweet and savouy dishes, breakfast cereals, snack-foods, tea and traditional foods.

Coriander

Coriander

Coriander is a spice produced from the round, tan-colored seeds of the coriander plant (Coriandrum sativum), which is a member of the parsley family. The word coriander can be used to describe the entire plant.

Pink peppercorns

Pink peppercorns

Pink peppercorns although being a dried berry, it came to be called such because they resemble peppercorns, and because they, too, have a peppery flavor. They are also used as a spice.

Territories & Album

The People

Yves Rafattelli

Master Distiller

Yves grew up on the hills of Upper-Provence, where his father used to take him hunting and fishing, as well as picking mushrooms and harvesting herbs used in traditional Provence meals. Yves joined the Distillery in 1981, and he acquired his know how in distilling herbs from Jean Augier, a 3rd generation distiller, who started distilling in the late 1940s with his father. “Each still has its own personality” says Yves “Jean knew ours perfectly and taught me all that was there to know. Mastering the old still helped me tremendously in choosing a new one, when we had to change machinery in 2017. It is not only about the quality of the raw materials, the way you operate your still has to match the quality of what you are distilling as well.” Yves now has perfect control of the distillation process, and yet he learns something new every day which is what he loves the most about his job. “It is the "charm of the still” Yves likes to say “There's always the expectation of what's going to come out. Every shift turns into a challenge on how to extract the most subtle scented spirits.”

The People

Helene Rogeon

Master Blender

Helene Rogeon, born in the region of Cognac in 1962, joined the distillery as an oenologist in 1986, right after graduating from Bordeaux Wine University. Helene loves assembling botanicals and wines to create great flavors, and she turned her passion into her profession. As an oenologist, Helene created the recipe of Absentroux in the 2000’, when vermouths were allowed again to use wormwood (their original core ingredient before it was banned in 1912). As a master blender, Helene checks that the right amount of each ingredient is used correctly. She is responsible for keeping the final flavor constant.

The History

1798

The first appearance in the dictionary of the word Vermouth, which derives from the German Wermut meaning “wormwood”, or “absinthe”.

18th Century

Is when the custom of serving this type of drink as an aperitif began in the Italian Piedmont: Italian Vermut “aperitif of white wine flavored with herbs”. The original vermouths were extremely bitter because of the quantity of lemon balm, and became products recommended by doctors for their purgative and vermifuge qualities.

1786

It was therefore thanks to the Italians that vermouth developed, and notably Carpano who established his production in Turin in 1786 using a recipe gleaned from his grandmother who had obtained it from a Bavarian monk. He followed in the footsteps of Antonio Cinzano, known as a “producer of elixirs” from 1568. In 1757 the Cinzano company set up in Turin.  

1800

At Marseillan in the south of France, Joseph Noilly invented a good recipe and experienced great success with the first French dry vermouth.

1821

When it is attributed the birth of the veritable vermouth of Chambery to the distiller Chavasse, creating fierce competition for the vermouth of Turin for a time.

1840

Gaspare Campari and Alassandro Martini, both liqueur experts in the famous bars of Turin, founded their own establishment to make a vermouth from a family recipe.


Later, Gaspare Campari was to make a great reputation for himself in Milan with his bitters.  

Lillet also became very famous in Bordeaux.